Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

The Assignment: Horror Podcast

CoverWe celebrated April Fool’s Day at The Assignment: Horror Podcast by turning the tables on our three older horror movie buffs. This episode, it’s John, Jerry, and Becca who find themselves locked in the dungeon and assigned a movie to watch by Richard. Richard’s assignment to the crew is a movie he stumbled across some time back and quite enjoyed, 2006’s Open Water 2: Adrift.

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Happy Birthday, Roger

Posted: April 5, 2018 in Uncategorized

The Assignment: Horror Podcast

RogerRoger Corman is 92 today. Happy Birthday to the man who changed Hollywood thanks to the “Corman School” and the over 350 movies with his name on them. 

You’ve given us a lot, Roger. Thank you, and Happy Birthday.

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The Assignment: Horror Podcast

XThis week’s assignment was chosen by John because of the year he was born and because it’s just a great film all around.X: The Man With the X-Ray Eyeswas at  the time of its filming the best of the Roger Corman science fiction efforts, and it’s a favorite of the Assignment Horror crew. But will Richard find it an entertaining cautionary tale of science (or a scientist) gone wrong or will he find it dated and stale? 

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A movie that has to be seen to be believed!

And then forgotten as quickly as possible.

The Assignment: Horror Podcast

By Jerry Chandler

CoverMonsteris one of those films you watch and then immediately try to forget you ever saw it. Of course, the danger in that is you might accidently watch it again one day, and repeated exposure to this film could cause lasting damage to the otherwise sane mind. The danger of doing so is increased when the film found itself receiving multiple new names in a fairly short amount of time. It’s also been known as It Came from the Lake, Monstroid, Monstroid: It Came from the Lake, The Toxic Horror, Toxic Monster, The Beast from Beyond, and Monster, the Legend That Became a Terror. I suspect there were a few other titles that have been missed as they likely renamed it as much as possible in the early cable era and the age of the Mom & Pop Video…

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The Assignment: Horror Podcast

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WARNING: Spoilers Ahead

Strangler of the Swampwas a 1946 production from Producers Releasing Corporation (PRC) and quite possibly one of their best early films. That may not be saying much, though. PRC films from that era also included things like The Devil Bat, Jungle Man, and Nabonga.

Strangler of the Swampwas written and directed by Frank Wisbar with additional contributions to the screenplay by Leo McCarthy and Harold Erickson. It may be worth noting here that of the lot of them, only Wisbar has more than a handful of credits on his filmmaking resume, but the vast majority of his credits are as unknown to most film fans as most of theirs. Judging by the quality of Strangler of the Swamp, there’s probably a good reason for this.

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The Assignment: Horror Podcast

QuennThis week’s assignment was Becca’s pick, and it’s a film with an interesting history. 1966’s Queen of Blood was one of a number of “American” films created on the cheap by doing fast, low budget shoots by an American production company and then editing that footage into a film using additional footage from an existing foreign film the studio purchased the rights for. In this case, it was actually two Russian films. One of those films was then reused again after this for yet another film by some of the people involved with the production of Queen of Blood.

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The Assignment: Horror Podcast

Cover1968’s Night of the Living Dead was one of those rare films that seemed to have come out of nowhere, but had the effect of changing cinema as we know it. Not only did it inspire an army of independent and guerilla filmmakers to go out and bring their own cinematic visions to life with or without the help of a studio system, but Romero, Russo, and crew did something that few others in modern cinema history can claim to have done. They invented an entirely new genre (or subgenre) of filmmaking by giving cinematic birth to the creature we now know as the modern zombie. 

As such, it’s not surprising that the film would eventually get the Criterion Collection treatment. Although, some may wonder why it took so long. A lot of work and a lot of care went into bringing us a fantastic package, and the Night of…

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