Archive for the ‘Entertainment’ Category

I’ve been neglecting the blog of late. I haven’t been writing stuff for it, and I haven’t been linking my work elsewhere. I can’t fix the first one today, but I can play catch up on the second. So, without further ado…

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“There Will Be No WWE Women’s Revolution until the Old Guard is Gone “

I hated writing that headline, but I’m certainly starting to feel that it’s true. The WWE has been making a lot of noise about their women’s division of late, and, to a large degree, it’s deserved. On a purely technical level, the division has some of the best workers in it that it’s seen in a long time. On a purely entertainment level, you’ve got a larger number of workers who show a stronger and better foundation for being able to engage an audience than they’ve had on their roster in a long while. But, in the end, none of that may matter in the here and now because of who currently makes the ultimate creative decisions for WWE programming.

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Decades of Horror is the Gruesome Magazine (home of Horror News Radio) podcast dedicated to specific eras of horror film-making. It started with Decades of Horror the 1970s, but after the success of that series it slowly branched out to include more eras in their own podcasts.

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Jerome Maida who writes theGeekarticles over at Philly.com asked me to send him my thoughts on Marvel’s Iron Fist for an upcoming piece he was working on. I had a word limit which I (of course) totally blew. This was okay because he had more to pull quotes from, or at least that’s what I told myself.

The piece dropped today and my words are in there along with Jerome’s of course. I expected that for obvious reasons. But I’m also sharing the printed page with Roy Thomas and legendary artist ChrisCross. That’s pretty cool.

Obviously, my contributions had to be trimmed quite substantially to make room for the bigger names. Obviously, I’m cool with that. But I figured I’d expand them a bit here. Below the cut is a link to the Philly Geek article. Give it a read and see what everyone has to say. When you’re done, come back and look at the rest of this entry. It’s one of the last runs I made at trimming down the over 1,100 word draft I started out with.

I was supposed to shoot for 500. As I frequently say on The Pro Wrestling Roundtable Podcast– I got long-winded again.

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Marvel’s batting average on Netflix has been pretty good so far. Daredevil had many people changing their tune about how Marvel was unable to get its act together on the small screen; Jessica Jones was tremendously well received by fans and critics alike; Luke Cage brought things to a whole new level even if the series fell off a bit in the last few episodes. All that was needed to properly ready fans for The Defenders was the premier of the series featuring the last of the four of them. So last weekend Netflix dropped Iron Fist for binge hungry superhero fans everywhere. Iron Fist was to square off against an adversary that none of the others had to fight though.

The show faced a social controversy over the casting of the lead character long before the first scene was ever shot. When it became clear that the powers that be were not going to change the course of their casting choices, there seemed to be a growing chorus of people who wanted the show to fail no matter what. This was above and beyond the now expected gaggle of critics who these days simply cheers on the idea of “Marvel’s first big bomb” before every new Marvel release. When the flood of negative reviews- some even referencing the casting issue -came in during the week before its release, it created a bit of an issue. Where the reviews completely legitimate or were some of them negative because they wanted to be negative no matter what? Sure, every franchise has to make an inevitable misstep, but was the show truly as bad on so many levels as they were saying or was this in part the tail trying to wag the dog? That was at least one of the things on my mind when I sat down to start watching Iron Fist last Friday.

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madness

Athena is the story of Carl, a man living with both emotional and physical scars in the wake of his wife’s death. His life is crumbling around him, he’s tormented by dreams of his wife, and he’s turned to means of dealing with his issues that are not all entirely healthy for him; including tuning out the rest of the world. Athena is the story of Emily, a slightly schizophrenic, manic depressive who is doing okay handling her issues. She also seems to care for Carl. Then there is Athena, a voice that starts talking to Carl from inside of his head. Carl may be going mad, but then the voice begins talking to Emily as well. What is Athena? What does she want? Is she trying to help two damaged people, or is she trying to hasten their self-destruction? Athena is an independent film from Image Impact Group, GreySun Productions, the late writer Michael Louis Calvillo, and director Robert W. Filion.

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cover

This is not exactly new news. As a matter of fact, it’s old enough that it was discussed as a part of the reason we’re seeing a new King Kong film in 2017. We’re getting Kong: Skull Island in part- perhaps in large part –because they want a “shared universe” in order to have King Kong eventually meet the King of Monsters for a big budget, Hollywood battle royal.

Now, I’m not as anti-remake as a lot of other people can be. My attitude towards remakes with regards to potential quality is that they have a no greater or lesser chance at being good than an original film. I don’t do the complaints that remakes always suck, shouldn’t be made, or are never as good as the original, so that’s not what this is about. But I do occasionally wonder what they’re thinking when they decide that they’re going to do a certain property and how they intend to do it. So, along with a bit of a review of the original film, that’s what I’ll be doing here.

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